Tessa Wegert

Tessa Wegert

RSS

explore-blog:

In 1947, ten cartoonists drew their most famous characters blindfolded. Best thing since famous authors’ hand-drawn self-portraits, which invariably require a different kind of blindness. 

(via thenearsightedmonkey)

Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won’t have as much censorship because we won’t have as much fear.

- Judy Blume (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

Can Carl Hiaasen Save Florida?

A new novel, a fictional character’s ongoing environmental crusade.

The Summharry: The entire plot of the Harry Potter series in one image. 

The Summharry: The entire plot of the Harry Potter series in one image

Vermont Helps Shape New Era of the Library

Modern libraries are all about innovation.

explore-blog:

Italian physicist-turned-sensor-developer Benedetto Vigna on how sensors are changing storytelling and the human experience of reality – a short animation for the 2014 Future of Storytelling summit.  

Interesting overview of the role of sensors in our modern lives.

newleafliterary:

Naturally.

newleafliterary:

Naturally.

(Source: thebarnesandnoble)

Game: How to be a writer - Los Angeles Times

There is no single path to literary success. “Roll a die and see where the writing life takes you.”

Sep 8
nprfreshair:

When The Great Gatsby was published in 1925, it flopped. In fact, it didn’t get its second wind until World War II when it was given to soldiers to carry in their pockets—over 123,000 copies were distributed. 
Today we talk about the history of Gatsby and why it endures. Fresh Air’s book critic Maureen Corrigan just wrote a book about this very subject. It’s called “So We Read On,” a reference to the final words of Gatsby, “And So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
In the conversation, Corrigan tells us that Gatsby has quite a few film noir tropes: 

"Gatsby almost has the form of a film noir, where you have this voiceover with [narrator] Nick Carraway remembering things that have taken place in the past, things that can’t be changed, events that can’t be changed.
It’s a violent story. There are three violent deaths in Gatsby. It’s a story in which you get bootlegging, crime, explicit sexuality — and remember this is 1925 when it was published, so it’s pretty racy for its time.
… We don’t explicitly read about [sex] but in Chapter Two, Nick is taken along by Tom Buchanan … on a joy ride into Manhattan where Tom takes Nick to … a drunken party in The Love Nest. So we know that there’s infidelity — a lot of innuendo — about people having sex outside of marriage and a lot of drinking.
And, most importantly, film noir, hardboiled detective fiction and The Great Gatsby — they’re all stories that are obsessed with the presence of fate. There’s a very fated feel to Gatsby. Events that occur in the novel, they’re foretold many times. That car crash in which Myrtle Wilson is killed, Tom’s mistress, there are two other car crashes that preceded that car crash. So a lot of events are predicted in this novel.”

Photo: Benn Mitchell 

nprfreshair:

When The Great Gatsby was published in 1925, it flopped. In fact, it didn’t get its second wind until World War II when it was given to soldiers to carry in their pockets—over 123,000 copies were distributed. 

Today we talk about the history of Gatsby and why it endures. Fresh Air’s book critic Maureen Corrigan just wrote a book about this very subject. It’s called “So We Read On,” a reference to the final words of Gatsby, “And So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

In the conversation, Corrigan tells us that Gatsby has quite a few film noir tropes: 

"Gatsby almost has the form of a film noir, where you have this voiceover with [narrator] Nick Carraway remembering things that have taken place in the past, things that can’t be changed, events that can’t be changed.

It’s a violent story. There are three violent deaths in Gatsby. It’s a story in which you get bootlegging, crime, explicit sexuality — and remember this is 1925 when it was published, so it’s pretty racy for its time.

… We don’t explicitly read about [sex] but in Chapter Two, Nick is taken along by Tom Buchanan … on a joy ride into Manhattan where Tom takes Nick to … a drunken party in The Love Nest. So we know that there’s infidelity — a lot of innuendo — about people having sex outside of marriage and a lot of drinking.

And, most importantly, film noir, hardboiled detective fiction and The Great Gatsby — they’re all stories that are obsessed with the presence of fate. There’s a very fated feel to Gatsby. Events that occur in the novel, they’re foretold many times. That car crash in which Myrtle Wilson is killed, Tom’s mistress, there are two other car crashes that preceded that car crash. So a lot of events are predicted in this novel.”

Photo: Benn Mitchell 

Lost chapter of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory published

Interesting history here on the book’s original characters and form.

"A survey in the United Kingdom named Milne’s book the most beloved children’s book of the past 150 years." 
Happy birthday, Winnie the Winnipeg Bear!
Winnie the Pooh saga turns 100 years old

"A survey in the United Kingdom named Milne’s book the most beloved children’s book of the past 150 years." 

Happy birthday, Winnie the Winnipeg Bear!

Winnie the Pooh saga turns 100 years old

explore-blog:

This wonderful short film chronicles a day in the life of a printmaker – here’s to hoping it never ends up among this omnibus of bittersweet short films about obsolete occupations